d3lt4:

Fibonacci Sequence (Triangle) Print.

(60x80 cm) 

Fibonacci, Italian mathematician of the 12th century.

“What would aliens say when told Earthlings shift clocks twice a year to fool themselves into thinking there’s more sunlight.”
— Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson)

what the fuck this dude oh my god, oh my god, sure for a guy that smart he can be fucking dense sometimes uh?

it’s not about thinking there’s more, it’s about moving the daylight around a bit where it actually makes a bit of difference. what the fuck this dude i swear

(via parislemon)

eh, dogs have been issued megaphones since forever.

thisistheverge:

Your meat addiction is destroying the planet (but we can fix it)

“Jesus,” Molly said, her own plate empty, “gimme that. You know what this costs?” She took his plate. “They gotta raise a whole animal for years and then they kill it. This isn’t vat stuff.” She forked a mouthful up and chewed.” – William Gibson, Neuromancer (1984) 

On Monday, August 6th, 2013, at a television studio in London in front of around 100 people, Dr. Mark Post of Maastricht University in the Netherlands unveiled the culmination of five years of research: a lab-grown “test tube” beef burger, cooked in a pan and served to two members of the public. Though a handful of tiny pieces of such meat had previously been displayed, the burger in that pan was the first fully cooked specimen tasted and admired by everyday citizens. “A few cells that we take from a cow,” Post says, can be turned into “10 tons of meat.” What Hanni Rützler, an Austrian researcher, and Josh Schonwald, a Chicago-based food writer — the “tasters” — were eating was 100 percent perfect beef. It had never been slaughtered, had never been properly “alive,” and most importantly, had never been a living, breathing animal. The meat, which contained no fat, was pronounced to have “quite a bit of flavor” by Rützler, and the consistency was said to be “perfect.” “Some people think this is science fiction,” Sergey Brin, founder of Google and the single donor who provided funding (nearly $1 million thus far) for Post’s research, said, but he sees it as an achievable goal.

thenoobyorker:

geneticist:

A monument at the Institute of Cytology and Genetics to all lab rats used for DNA research (via)

Our friend the rat, a noble sport with few words and a small but figuratively large heart. The former likely being because of its inability to grasp or master language. Idiots. In any case, thank you.

Thank you for being a friend.

(via genericlatino)

robsheridan:

Beautiful hi-res black & white photos of vintage NASA facilities from the 1920s through the 1960s. The first one, from 1949, is an Analog Computing Machine, an early version of the modern computer. Many more here. (via Brain Pickings)

robsheridan:

Beautiful hi-res black & white photos of vintage NASA facilities from the 1920s through the 1960s. The first one, from 1949, is an Analog Computing Machine, an early version of the modern computer. Many more here. (via Brain Pickings)